Photo by Graham Ruttan on Unsplash

A big thank you to Carisa, Heidi, Karen, Laura, & Terri – the dedicated RN’s at Park Allergy Center!

Happy Nurses Day!


All allergy injections for environmental allergies will resume on Monday May 4.

New Shot Hours starting Monday May 4: 8:30am – 4pm Monday through Thursday

  • Please review our recent policy changes regarding social distancing, screening, and required facial masks as those policies will remain in effect.
  • The total number of patients/visitors in the building will be capped.
  • PLEASE EXPECT LONGER THAN USUAL WAIT TIMES.

Effective immediately, ALL patients entering Park Allergy Center, whether for an appointment, treatment, or allergy injection, will be required to wear a facial mask (cloth facial coverings acceptable). All patients are asked to bring and use their own mask as our supply is almost exhausted. Following is a link to the latest CDC recommendation regarding the use of cloth facial masks in public. https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cloth-face-cover.html

As always, thank you for your understanding and trust in Park Allergy Center.

Effective immediately, administration of allergy injections will be limited to asthmatics and patients with stinging insect allergies.  

All non-urgent, in-office appointments will be rescheduled either to a later date or to a Telemedicine appointment.  

We feel this new policy achieves the best balance of honoring Governor Whitmer’s Stay-At-Home order while continuing to provide care for those most at risk.


Also, please refer to the latest Policy Update dated April 6, 2020. https://www.parkallergy.com/policy-update-april-6-2020/

Thank you for your understanding and your continued trust in Park Allergy Center. 

Photo by Ales Nesetril on Unsplash

Telemedicine has arrived at Park Allergy Center!   We are pleased to announce that we now offer online, video appointments.  Given the current SARS-CoV2 (COVID-19) Pandemic, many health insurance companies now cover telemedicine appointments.  Enjoy the benefits of receiving a consultation from Park Allergy Center while in the safety and security of your own home. If you’d like to schedule an online, video appointment please call our office at 269-321-6673.

Please call to reschedule all upcoming, non-urgent appointments. Thank you!

We are temporarily changing office hours! Starting Monday March 30 and going through Thursday April 16, we will open at 8:30am and close at 3pm Monday through Thursday. Shot hours will be from 8:30am – 2:25pm. We are planning on returning to our normal hours on Monday April 20 (subject to change).

Brett Molina, USA Today, 2019

Photo by Radu Marcusu

Oral treatment for peanut allergies dramatically increase allergic reactions compared to avoiding the treatment altogether, a study published Thursday revealed.

The study published in The Lancet pulled together results from 12 randomized, controlled trials, including more than 1,000 patients, to compare how participants fared using oral immunotherapy, a treatment where a person with an allergy is fed the allergen in small doses to help build up a tolerance.

The average age of participants was 9, researchers said. They were followed for about a year, measuring adverse reactions, the need to use epinephrine, and reports of anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction.

Results showed participants using oral treatment for a peanut allergy were three times more likely to report anaphylaxis than those who didn’t use the immunotherapy. Their risk of using epinephrine or suffering an adverse reaction was twice as high, said the study.

Meanwhile, the study also showed the quality of life for participants on the immunotherapy was no different than those who didn’t use the treatments.

“Our results do not denounce current research in oral immunotherapy, but the method needs to be more carefully considered, improvements in safety made, and measures of success need to be aligned with patients’ wishes,” said Dr. Derek Chu, lead author of the study and fellow in the Department of Medicine at McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, in a statement.

Last December, a study was released saying an experimental drug used to help build a tolerance over time to peanuts is ready for review by the Food and Drug Administration.

In an interview with USA TODAY, Chu said the trials administered immunotherapy in different ways, such as a powder to pour over food, a capsule, or through peanut butter or foods containing peanuts given in controlled doses. However, Chu said while on the immunotherapy, certain activities such as exercise or even a hot shower could trigger someone to have a severe reaction.

“This type of therapy is still investigational. It’s experimental,” Chu said. “Patients need to know the facts exactly where the field is at.”

There are currently no approved treatments for peanut allergies. In 2017, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease updated guidelines on peanut allergies, saying they could be curbed by introducing items containing the food as soon as early infancy. 

ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, IL – (APRIL 2, 2019) – Allergy shots (subcutaneous immunotherapy or SCIT) have been available for more than 100 years. Allergy tablets (sublingual immunotherapy or SLIT) have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the United States for four years. A new study in Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, the scientific journal of the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) shows that most American allergists now prescribe the tablets for some patients to treat certain allergies. The study was developed by the ACAAI Immunotherapy and Diagnostics Committee.

“Five years ago, allergy tablets hadn’t been approved by the FDA and weren’t being prescribed for people with allergies in the U.S.,” said allergist Anita Sivam, DO, ACAAI member and lead author. “Allergists were prescribing allergy shots because they were, and continue to be, a proven effective treatment. Once allergy tablets were approved in 2014, allergists began prescribing them for their patients. Of the 268 US allergists who responded to our survey in 2018, 197 (73 percent) reported prescribing allergy tablets.”

Allergy tablets are available to treat northern grass pollens, Timothy grass pollen, ragweed and house dust mite. The northern grass pollens and the Timothy grass pollen tablets are both approved down to age 5 years and the other two for those 18 years and older. The tablets differ from allergy shots because after the first dose is given in an allergist’s office, they can be taken at home. The tablets are placed under the tongue and dissolve.

In immunotherapy, the regular administration of the allergen doses causes your immune system to become less sensitive to the allergen. Reducing your sensitivity reduces your allergy symptoms.

“One of the big differences between shots and tablets is that shots are formulated by your allergist to treat your specific allergy or allergies,” says allergist Mike Tankersley, MD, MBA, vice-chair of the ACAAI Immunotherapy and Diagnostics Committee and co-author of the study. “Tablets target a single allergy, and our study found that was the main barrier for allergists in prescribing tablets. If a patient has more than one allergy and is able to travel regularly to receive allergy shots, an allergist may recommend shots over tablets.”

Both shots and tablets – the only FDA-approved immunotherapy treatments for allergies – are successful because they work by changing your immune system. They decrease some cells, chemicals and antibodies in your system that cause allergy symptoms and increase others that improve health. Allergy shots and tablets allow you to encounter your allergens without having a reaction. Immunotherapy also reduces the inflammation that characterizes hay fever and asthma, so many sufferers find their symptoms improve.

To find an allergist near you who can help create a personal immunotherapy plan for your allergies or asthma and help you lead the life you want to live, use the ACAAI allergist locator.

Citation:  https://acaai.org/news/new-research-shows-73-percent-allergists-prescribe-under-tongue-allergy-tablets?

Park Allergy Center provides both oral drops or tablets for allergy immunotherapy treatment.

 

FDA OKs 1st generic version of popular Advair asthma inhaler

January 30, 2019

The first generic version of the popular Advair asthma inhaler has been approved by U.S. regulators.

The Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved Mylan’s version in three strengths for ages 4 and up.

The inhalers are used twice daily to keep airways open and prevent flare-ups of wheezing, shortness of breath and other symptoms of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. About 42 million Americans have those conditions.

The device contains two medicines, inhaled in a precise mixture. That complexity has stymied a couple of other companies developing generic versions of GlaxoSmithKline’s Advair Diskus inhaler, which costs about $400 a month.

Generics generally are cheaper. Mylan didn’t immediately respond to queries about when its inhaler, called Wixela Inhub, will be available or what the price will be.

Citation:  https://www.apnews.com/20414480b66e4a06970a92b48a412e01